Lower Ab Workout

Army Crawlarmy crawl

Get down into a plank position, squeezing your butt, with a glider under each foot, on the edge of your mat. Using your forearms, crawl forward about five steps, until your gliders hit the end of the mat, and then crawl back. Make sure to hold the plank position and keep legs straight and hips stable. Do this 3-5 times, counting forward and back as one full rep.

C-Curvec-curve-weigth

This exercise is a great standard move to keep on hand that lengthens and takes pressure off the lower back, which ab workouts tend to strain. “A basic c-curve is very therapeutic after the glide work, so it makes sense to do this in conjunction with the glide work,” Stokes notes.

To get into position, first sit on the floor on your tailbone, as if you are about to lower back into a sit-up position, with a ball (you can sub a T-shirt or pillow, too) squeezed tightly between your thighs. “When you hold something [here] and squeeze, you engage the inner thigh which works more through the low abdomen,” Stokes says. Rest on your elbows and make sure to maintain that height throughout. Arch your back into a small stretch, tuck the tailbone and drive the low back down. Pick your elbows up and hold onto the backs of your thighs. Keep shoulders down, chin open, and elbows wide. This is the c-curve position.

From here, grab a set of light weights (soup cans work, too!) and hold arms out by your knees. Lower arms and tap the ground, then lift back to start position. Repeat as you hold the c-curve for 60-90 seconds, concentrating on the arm movements the entire time. You can even do bicep curls instead, Stokes says. “Anything to take your mind off the fact your abs are burning.”

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